An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15849 entries, 13787 authors and 1925 subjects. Updated: January 28, 2023

HUNT, Anthony "Tony" B.

5 entries
  • 8877

Popular medicine in thirteenth-century England: Introduction and texts.

Cambridge, England: Boydell & Brewer, 1990.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 7131

The medieval surgery by Tony Hunt.

Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Boydell Press, 1992.

Reproduction of 51 drawings from Trinity College, Cambridge, MS 0.1.20 of the surgery of Roger of Parma, best known as Roger of Salerno, with detailed explanation of each drawing by Tony Hunt.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana
  • 8578

Anglo-Norman Medicine I: Roger Frugard's Chirurgia and the Practica Brevis of [Johannes] Platearius. II: Shorter treatises. Edited by Tony Hunt. 2 vols.

Cambridge, England: D. S. Brewer, 19941997.
Vol. 1: First published edition of two 13th century Anglo-Norman medical treatises translated from Latin. Matthaeus Platearius and his brother Johannes were the sons of a female physician from the Salerno school who was married to Johannes Platearius I; it is possible that she was Trotula. The second volume includes all vernacular medical texts contained in Trinity College, Cambridge, MS 0.1.20, presenting a treatise on visiting the sick and a verse translation of the first part of the celebrated gynaecological compilation known as `Trotula', with their Latin originals. To these are added  the Euperiston and the Trinity `Practica'. Hunt's Introduction illustrated characteristic features of the medieval medical compendium through the example of the Speculum medicorum, which was previously unstudied.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana
  • 8875

Three receptaria from Medieval England: The languages of medicine in the fourteenth century. Edited by Tony Hunt with the collaboration of Michael Benskin.

Oxford: Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature, 2001.

An edition of just over 1500 medical receipts transmitted in three fourteenth-century compendia. The particular interest of these multilingual compilations lies in their date – earlier than most published receipts – and their showing the three languages of medieval England in vigorous and simultaneous use. There are detailed indexes, including a survey of the medical conditions covered, and the notes provide comprehensive references to analogous receipts in other published collections, so shedding light on the processes of compilation and transmission.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9809

An Old French herbal (Ms Princeton U.L. Garrett 131). Edited by Tony Hunt.

Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2009.

First edition of the earliest Old French herbal in verse— "a surprisingly comprehensive work (3188 octosyllables), based on an eleventh-century Latin treatise 'De viribus herbarum' attributed to a certain 'Macer'. It occupies a significant place in the development of herbals and is an interesting witness to writing in Western France in the thirteenth century and to the unusual syntax and concentrated style of its author. Some one hundred and twenty-five plants are described together with their medicinal uses, which cover a remarkable range of ailments. For ease of recognition the sections of text which do not seem to be based on the received text of 'Macer' are printed in italics. Quotations from the principal source and from parallels are given in the notes" (publisher).



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › France, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines