An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

16011 entries, 14068 authors and 1941 subjects. Updated: June 22, 2024

MOONEY, Linne R.

1 entries
  • 8366

Monica H. Green & Linne R. Mooney: Gilbertus Anglicus, "The Sickness of Women," IN: Sex, Aging and Death in a Medieval Medical Compendium: MS Trinity College Cambridge R.14.52, Its Language, Scribe, and Texts. Edited by M. Teresa Tavormina. Vol. 2., pp. 455-568.

Tucson, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2006.

"Gilbertus's Compendium medicinae was translated into Middle English in the early 15th century.[4] The gynecological and obstetrical portions of that translation were soon excerpted and circulated widely as an independent text known in modern scholarship as The Sickness of Women. That text was then modified further in the mid-15th century by the addition of materials from Muscio and other sources on obstetrics; this is known as The Sickness of Women 2.[5] Between them, the two versions of The Sickness of Women were the most widely circulated Middle English texts on women's medicine in the 15th century, even more popular than the several Middle English versions of the Trotula texts" (Wikipedia article on Gilbertus Anglicus, accessed 01-2017).



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives