An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15953 entries, 13928 authors and 1934 subjects. Updated: December 11, 2023

TROTA OF SALERNO, (Trotula)

5 entries
  • 6009.1

Experimentarius medicinae. Continens Trotulae curandarum aegriudinum muliebrium ante, in & post partium lib. unicum, nusquam antea editum…[Georg Kraut]

Strasbourg, France: apud Joannem Schottum, 1544.

First printed edition of the gynecological writings attributed to the woman physician, Trota, who is frequently called Trotula after the name of the collection of works with whom she is associated. Trota is said to have taught at Salerno during the 12th century. Trota was the earliest woman physician to write significant medical treatises. Her writings were Liber de sinthomatibus mulierum ("Book on the Conditions of Women"), De curis mulierum ("On Treatments for Women", and De ornatu mulierum ("On Women’s Cosmetics"). "The Trotula was published not because it was still of immediate clinical use to learned physicians (it had been superseded in that role by a variety of other texts in the 15th century), but because it had been newly "discovered" as a witness to empirical medicine by a Strasbourg publisher, Johannes Schottus. Schottus persuaded a physician colleague, Georg Kraut, to edit the Trotula, which Schottus then included in a volume he called Experimentarius medicinae ("Collection of Tried-and-True Remedies of Medicine"), which also included the Physica of Trota of Salerno's near contemporary, Hildegard of Bingen. Kraut, seeing the disorder in the texts, but not recognizing that it was really the work of three separate authors, rearranged the entire work into 61 themed chapters. He also took the liberty of altering the text here and there. As [Monica] Green has noted, "The irony of Kraut's attempt to endow "Trotula" with a single, orderly, fully rationalized text was that, in the process, he was to obscure for the next 400 years the distinctive contributions of the historic woman Trota" (Wikipedia article on Trotula, accessed 08-03-15). 



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1000 - 1499, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1500 - 1799
  • 11838

La practica secundum Trotam: Testo, traduzione, appendici e glossario. By Piero Cantalupo.

Boll. Stor. di Salerno e Principato Citra, 13, 1-104, 1995.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1000 - 1499
  • 12953

The knowing of woman's kind in childing: A Middle English version of material derived from the "Trotula" and other sources. (Medieval women: Texts and contexts, 4). Edited by Alexandra Barratt.

Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2001.
The core of this text is an Englished version of a 13th-century Anglo-Norman translation of the Trotula. The redactor also incorporated the "Non omnes quidem" version of Muscio, amplifying the meager obstetrical material from the Trotula.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
  • 8577

The Trotula: A medieval compendium of women's medicine, edited and translated by Monica H. Green.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002.

A new translation of a new edition of the texts based on collation of 9 MSS from the second half of the 13th or early 14th century. "The Trotula was the most influential compendium on women's medicine in medieval Europe. Scholarly debate has long focused on the traditional attribution of the work to the mysterious Trotula, said to have been the first female professor of medicine in eleventh- or twelfth-century Salerno, just south of Naples, then the leading center of medical learning in Europe. Yet as Monica H. Green reveals in her introduction to this first edition of the Latin text since the sixteenth century, and the first English translation of the book ever based upon a medieval form of the text, the Trotula is not a single treatise but an ensemble of three independent works, each by a different author. To varying degrees, these three works reflect the synthesis of indigenous practices of southern Italians with the new theories, practices, and medicinal substances coming out of the Arabic world" (publisher).



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1000 - 1499, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 8556

La Scuola Medica Salernitana. Gli autori e i testi. Convegno internazionale, Università degli studi di Salerno, 3-5 novembre 2004. A cura di Danielle Jacquart e Agostino Paravicini Bagliani. Edizione Nazionale La Scuola Medica Salernitana, 01.

Florence: Sismel. Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2007.

Includes on pp. 185-188, and 211-13, Monica H. Green, "Reconstructing the oeuvre of Trota of Salerno." Also, on pp. 15-60, Monica H. Green, “Rethinking the manuscript basis of Salvatore De Renzi’s Collectio Salernitana: The corpus of medical Writings in the ‘long’ twelfth century,"



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Italy, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana