An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15959 entries, 13943 authors and 1935 subjects. Updated: March 1, 2024

GILMAN, Alfred Goodman

2 entries
  • 14143

Resolution of some components of adenylate cyclase necessary for catalytic activity.

J. biol. Chem. , 252, 6966-6969, 1977.

Goodman shared the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Martin Rodbell "for their discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells." In this paper Goodman and Ross showed that a guanine nucleotide binding protein (a "G" protein) activates adenylate cyclase. They posited a system whereby a hormone receptor (adrenergic), interacts with guanine nucleotides (G proteins), and these in turn activate the enzyme adenylate cyclase, but they qualified this with a statement that "proof of function of each entity must await their purification."

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Protein Receptors
  • 14144

Reconstitution of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity with resolved components of the enzyme.

J. biol. Chem. , 253, 6401-12, 1978.

Gilman and colleagues showed that G proteins are in the cell membrane and are stimulated once a ligand (adrenaline) binds the adrenergic receptor. This system can then activate adenyl cyclase to form cyclic AMP. Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Ross, Howlett, Ferguson, Gilman.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Protein Receptors